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Wednesday, July 30, 2008

I FEP Question Answers on Novel

Dear FEP 08-11 Students, please post your questions and answers in the comment section of this blog.

However, it is important that you give the complete URL of the internet source you have referred to to find the answer. In case of a book, give the complete title, author's names, place of publication, publisher's name and year of publication.

For better idea so citing/referencing please enter 'bibliography' in the search box above and find my write up on that.

45 comments:

Hemu said...

hemanth
1st FEP
08D4469


1st english novel-"LE MORTE D'ARTHUR"
WRITTEN CIRCA 1470 PUBLISHED 1485

tom said...

Roll No08d4470
Shinoj M A
1 FEP


Q: How to write a novel?
1. First you need to come up with an idea. You can try reading other books, watching movies, listening to music, etc. for inspiration, or just waiting until that perfect idea "hits" you. The best ideas come when you aren't trying to think of anything.
2. Write down all your ideas for characters, events, places, or anything else. Later you can reference this list when you are ready to begin writing.
3. Decide what you want your book to be about. At this point you just need to know the basics. Who will the main characters be and what will they try to accomplish.
4. Think of a setting for your novel. Choose the year, the genre, and other "beginning details."
5. Create your protagonist. Remember, the protagonist is not always the "good guy," they're simply the main character; they are the person your story is about. Make sure you create an original and believable character. To be believable, they need to have a past, fears, hopes, dreams, desires, family, job/family troubles, friends, associates, and a present.
6. Develop your plot. Is your protagonist trying to accomplish a goal? What steps do they need to take to get there? This is called the main conflict. What is the problem? Does trying to solve it create more problems? Plot advancement. Is your protagonist going to be a different person by the end of the book? Make sure your plot ties in with the theme of the book and leaves lots of wiggle room for things you might want to change later.
7. Create your supporting characters and antagonist.
8. Rewrite. The story is really written during this part. Editing and rewriting is what makes the story good -- a first draft will almost always be bad. Just rewrite. There is really no limit to the amount of time spent rewriting, so just keep doing it.
9. Show someone what you've done. Friends or family can help, as can some online communities. Consider joining a weekly or monthly creative writing group to get some more feedback.
10. Keep rewriting.

Source http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Book

thomas said...

RollNo: 08d4471
Thomas PV
1 FEP


Qs: What motivates a novelist to write a novel?

Ans: John Fowles has said that the primary motivation of the novelist is to create world other than, but as real as the real one.
(Source:Fiectional space in the modernist American novel of Carl Darry Malngreen.)

The other factors are:

- His past experiences, life situation.
- Thoughts, imagination, beauty of nature.
- Solidarity and harmony of creatures.

Anonymous said...

Some Most controversial novels
-Lajja-The Shame by Tasleema Nasreen
-The Da Vinci Code-Dan Brown
-The Satanic Versus-Salman Rushdie
These books bring out anti religious matters.

-Manfield Park-Jane Austen--The story begins when nine-year-old Fanny Price is taken from the home of her impoverished parents and moved to the estate of Mansfield Park to be brought up by rich relatives. This is no clear-cut Cinderella story, however. Although there are a couple of mildly wicked stepsisters (Fanny's cousins Maria and Julia) and a stand-in for a wicked stepmother in the form of her Aunt Norris, Fanny's central nemesis—and rival in love--is the saucy, sassy anti-heroine Mary Crawford.

In Mansfield Park, Jane Austen is clearly at the height of her storytelling mastery, deftly playing with reader loyalties and expectations while serving up the delicious social satire and suspenseful plotting that keep us coming back for more.
(source:about.com,Classic literature)

Anonymous said...

Some Most controversial novels
-Lajja-The Shame by Tasleema Nasreen
-The Da Vinci Code-Dan Brown
-The Satanic Versus-Salman Rushdie
These books bring out anti religious matters.

-Manfield Park-Jane Austen--The story begins when nine-year-old Fanny Price is taken from the home of her impoverished parents and moved to the estate of Mansfield Park to be brought up by rich relatives. This is no clear-cut Cinderella story, however. Although there are a couple of mildly wicked stepsisters (Fanny's cousins Maria and Julia) and a stand-in for a wicked stepmother in the form of her Aunt Norris, Fanny's central nemesis—and rival in love--is the saucy, sassy anti-heroine Mary Crawford.

In Mansfield Park, Jane Austen is clearly at the height of her storytelling mastery, deftly playing with reader loyalties and expectations while serving up the delicious social satire and suspenseful plotting that keep us coming back for more.
(source:about.com,Classic literature)

vidisha
1 Fep
08D4440

Komal Sarvi said...

Q: when did the first novel come into existence?
A: The Tale of Genji, a japanese book written by Murasaki Shikibu between 794 A.D and 1185 A.D, is considered to be the first novel. But it is highly debatable and hence in an attempt to sidestep these debates its called the "first psychological novel", "the first novel still considered to be a classic", or other more qualified terms.
Other novels that claim to be the first are Daphnis and Chloe and Aethiopica in Greek, which author Longus and Heliodorus of Emesa respectively wrote, both around the third century, and in Latin, Petronius's Satyricon in the first century and Apuleius's Golden Ass in the second, as well as Kādambari in Sanskrit which author Bānabhatta wrote in the seventh century.
So, the above could be the possible answer to the question.

Komal Sarvi
1st FEP
08D4474

Merlin said...

Merlin Abey Theressa
1st FEP
08D4425


Q.why did the genre survive?

One of the reasons the novel developed so well in the 18th century has to do with the changes which took place regarding the understanding of the self. There was, at this time, an increasing awareness of the individual. For us today, it may be difficult to imagine any time at which the individual or the self was not considered important. However, prior to the 17th and 18th centuries, the self or the individual was not much emphasized. What was important was society as a whole. The individual was merely one small member of that group or society. Thus, the self was primarily defined as being a part of a group. In the 18th century, however, an increasing awareness of the self as autonomous began to develop. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe reflects this development. The novel is a myth of the individual. Alone on his island, Crusoe creates a world by himself. He is not a part of a group. He is thus freer than individuals living in society; however, until a native to his island, whom he names Friday, arrives, he is also much lonelier.

The literary critic Ian Watt explains the close relationship between this developing understanding of the self and the development of the novel:
The novel is the form of literature which most fully reflects [the] individualist and innovating reorientation [of the 18th century]. Previous literary forms had reflected the general tendency of their cultures to make conformity to traditional practice the major test of truth: The plots of classical and renaissance epic, for example, were based on past history or fable, and the merits of the author's treatment were judged largely according to a view of literary decorum derived from the accepted models of the genre. This literary traditionalism was first and most fully challenged by the novel, whose primary criterion was truth to individual experience individual experience which is always unique and therefore new. The novel is thus the logical literary vehicle of a culture which, in the last few centuries, has set an unprecedented value on originality, on the novel; and it is therefore well named.
Watt goes on to explain that the novel is surely distinguished from other genres and from previous forms of fiction by the amount of attention it habitually accords both to the individualization of its characters and to the detailed presentation of their environment. In other words, setting and character, rather than plot and action, become of central importance to this form.
Also a significant development evident in the novel, is the awareness of time and its relation to the individual. We change over time. Previous experiences may affect us later on (cause and effect). Watt maintains that the novel in general has interested itself much more than any other literary form in the development of its characters in the course of time. The novel's detailed depiction of the concerns of everyday life also depends upon its power over the time dimension. The novel's closeness to the texture of daily experience directly depends upon its employment of a much more minutely discriminated time-scale than had previously been employed in narrative.
Along the same lines, Watt adds that the novel's plot is also distinguished from most previous fiction by its use of past experience as the cause of present action: a causal connexion operating through time replaces the reliance of earlier narratives on disguises and coincidences, and this tends to give the novel a much more coherent structure.
The novel is distinctive because it
$ provides an inexpensive, portable form of entertainment;
$ contains multiple interwoven plots and subplots, numerous characters, several themes, sometimes multiple narrators;
$ has "true to life" realism and believability (verisimilitude);
$ is sometimes distinguished from the romance because it gives a real, not imaginary, picture of life, and creates its own complex world in which characters and plots operate in a specific time and place;
$ contains many small climaxes throughout, not just a single intense effect;
$ is an ideal form for studying an individual's life in a context and over an extended period of time;
$ as a genre encompasses many different types of novels.

sources
www.google.com
www.did you know .com
www.fclassvaniercollege.qc.ca

Amrita said...

Q : What makes a novel "classic" ?

A :Morality - a classic novel should say something of value, drawing attention to human problems, condemn or applaud certain points of view. it should make a statement that is more significant than the "Chocolate cake is the world's best dessert" kind of comment. But we don't have to agree with the authors statement, it just has to be there.

Effective language - the language used should be forceful, fresh and not hackneyed, and suitable to the purposes of the statement/message.

Truthfulness - Is the work credible? Does the author make us believe what is being said? Such a standard cannot, of course, be applied literally. We do not believe in the literal truth of Gulliver's Travels or Candide, but we understand that the authors are using fantasy and exaggeration to communicate basic truths about humanity. Moreover, a good novel, story, or drama should give us the feeling that what happened to the characters was inevitable; that, given their temperaments and the situation in which they were placed, the outcome could not have been otherwise. Everything we know about Willie Loman in Death of a Salesman, for instance, makes his suicide inevitable. A different ending would have been disappointing and untrue.

Universality - Regardless of when it was written, the work should hold meaning still in the western world, and should still hold that meaning in the future. Huckleberry Finn, for example, although it has been called the first truly American novel, deals with a universal theme, the loss of innocence.

Timelessness - The work should be of lasting interest. The comments the author makes about people, about the pressure, rewards, and problems of life should still be relevant. The theme of the work should be as pertinent now as it was at the time it was written.

08D4449

Amrita said...

Q : What makes a novel "classic" ?

A :Morality - a classic novel should say something of value, drawing attention to human problems, condemn or applaud certain points of view. it should make a statement that is more significant than the "Chocolate cake is the world's best dessert" kind of comment. But we don't have to agree with the authors statement, it just has to be there.

Effective language - the language used should be forceful, fresh and not hackneyed, and suitable to the purposes of the statement/message.

Truthfulness - Is the work credible? Does the author make us believe what is being said? Such a standard cannot, of course, be applied literally. We do not believe in the literal truth of Gulliver's Travels or Candide, but we understand that the authors are using fantasy and exaggeration to communicate basic truths about humanity. Moreover, a good novel, story, or drama should give us the feeling that what happened to the characters was inevitable; that, given their temperaments and the situation in which they were placed, the outcome could not have been otherwise. Everything we know about Willie Loman in Death of a Salesman, for instance, makes his suicide inevitable. A different ending would have been disappointing and untrue.

Universality - Regardless of when it was written, the work should hold meaning still in the western world, and should still hold that meaning in the future. Huckleberry Finn, for example, although it has been called the first truly American novel, deals with a universal theme, the loss of innocence.

Timelessness - The work should be of lasting interest. The comments the author makes about people, about the pressure, rewards, and problems of life should still be relevant. The theme of the work should be as pertinent now as it was at the time it was written.

08D4449

Ash said...

Aishwarya Vijay
1st FEP
08D4473

The Complete List - ALL-TIME 100 Novels .
In Alphabetical Order


A - B
The Adventures of Augie March
Saul Bellow

All the King's Men
Robert Penn Warren

American Pastoral
Philip Roth

An American Tragedy
Theodore Dreiser

Animal Farm
George Orwell

Appointment in Samarra
John O'Hara

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret
Judy Blume

The Assistant
Bernard Malamud

At Swim-Two-Birds
Flann O'Brien

Atonement
Ian McEwan

Beloved
Toni Morrison

The Berlin Stories
Christopher Isherwood

The Big Sleep
Raymond Chandler

The Blind Assassin
Margaret Atwood

Blood Meridian
Cormac McCarthy

Brideshead Revisited
Evelyn Waugh


The Bridge of San Luis Rey
Thornton Wilder

C - D
Call It Sleep
Henry Roth

Catch-22
Joseph Heller

The Catcher in the Rye
J.D. Salinger


A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess

The Confessions of Nat Turner
William Styron

The Corrections
Jonathan Franzen

The Crying of Lot 49
Thomas Pynchon

A Dance to the Music of Time
Anthony Powell

The Day of the Locust
Nathanael West

Death Comes for the Archbishop
Willa Cather

A Death in the Family
James Agee

The Death of the Heart
Elizabeth Bowen

Deliverance
James Dickey

Dog Soldiers
Robert Stone

F - G
Falconer
John Cheever

The French Lieutenant's Woman
John Fowles

The Golden Notebook
Doris Lessing

Go Tell it on the Mountain
James Baldwin

Gone With the Wind
Margaret Mitchell

The Grapes of Wrath
John Steinbeck

Gravity's Rainbow
Thomas Pynchon

The Great Gatsby
F. Scott Fitzgerald

H - I
A Handful of Dust
Evelyn Waugh

The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter
Carson McCullers

The Heart of the Matter
Graham Greene

Herzog
Saul Bellow

Housekeeping
Marilynne Robinson

A House for Mr. Biswas
V.S. Naipaul

I, Claudius
Robert Graves

Infinite Jest
David Foster Wallace

Invisible Man
Ralph Ellison

L - N
Light in August
William Faulkner

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe
C.S. Lewis

Lolita
Vladimir Nabokov

Lord of the Flies
William Golding

The Lord of the Rings
J.R.R. Tolkien

Loving
Henry Green

Lucky Jim
Kingsley Amis

The Man Who Loved Children
Christina Stead

Midnight's Children
Salman Rushdie

Money
Martin Amis

The Moviegoer
Walker Percy

Mrs. Dalloway
Virginia Woolf

Naked Lunch
William Burroughs

Native Son
Richard Wright

Neuromancer
William Gibson

Never Let Me Go
Kazuo Ishiguro

1984
George Orwell

O - R
On the Road
Jack Kerouac

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Ken Kesey

The Painted Bird
Jerzy Kosinski

Pale Fire
Vladimir Nabokov

A Passage to India
E.M. Forster

Play It As It Lays
Joan Didion

Portnoy's Complaint
Philip Roth

Possession
A.S. Byatt

The Power and the Glory
Graham Greene

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
Muriel Spark

Rabbit, Run
John Updike

Ragtime
E.L. Doctorow

The Recognitions
William Gaddis

Red Harvest
Dashiell Hammett

Revolutionary Road
Richard Yates

S - T
The Sheltering Sky
Paul Bowles

Slaughterhouse-Five
Kurt Vonnegut

Snow Crash
Neal Stephenson

The Sot-Weed Factor
John Barth

The Sound and the Fury
William Faulkner

The Sportswriter
Richard Ford

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold
John le Carre

The Sun Also Rises
Ernest Hemingway

Their Eyes Were Watching God
Zora Neale Hurston

Things Fall Apart
Chinua Achebe

To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee

To the Lighthouse
Virginia Woolf

Tropic of Cancer
Henry Miller

U - W
Ubik
Philip K. Dick

Under the Net
Iris Murdoch

Under the Volcano
Malcolm Lowry

Watchmen
Alan Moore & Dave Gibbons

White Noise
Don DeLillo

White Teeth
Zadie Smith

Wide Sargasso Sea
Jean Rhys

SOURCE :
TIME Magazine

Samhita Rao said...

Q: where did the name "novel" evolve from?
A:A novel (from, Italian novella, Spanish novela, French nouvelle for "new", "news", or "short story of something new") is today a long written, fictional, prose narrative. The seventeenth-century genre conflict between long romances and short novels, novellas, has brought definitions of both traditions into the modern usage of the term.

Source: Wikipedia

08d4433

Anonymous said...

Tavishi Sahu 08D4465 1st FEP

Why English novels are more widely read than Indian novels in India itself?



In the earlier times reading and writing was restricted to few people in the upper strata of the society. With the advent of British English education was accessible to this group and thus people were influenced by English literature. It gave a sense of aristocracy to read English literature in the society at that time.


Post independence most schools and colleges were established and more people got access to education in general. Since the educational institutions prescribed English stories and novels students developed familiarity and appreciation towards English as a language. Thus they explored English novels otherwise too.


Since their mother tongue is English, English writers are fluent in their expression, use English as a thinking tool and their writing enables us to visualize and imagine. However Indian writers who write English novels do not demonstrate that fluency or playing around with words. Their novels also have a regional influence which most people do not relate to.


English novels use different themes (war, politics, romance, adventure, mystery) of writing that make it interesting and appealing to readers. Indian novels do not show the use of varied themes as their western counterparts.


Recently there has been an emergence of Indian writers writing in English. Writers are beginning to explore different themes in writing and the society may gradually appreciate it.

Anonymous said...

Q: Characteristics of novels
A:A novel (from, Italian novella, Spanish novela, French nouvelle for "new", "news", or "short story of something new") is today a long written, fictional, prose narrative. The seventeenth-century genre conflict between long romances and short novels, novellas, has brought definitions of both traditions into the modern usage of the term.

Source:http://www.cobar-h.schools.nsw.edu.au/Documents/Year%2012/English/Looking%20For%20Alibr%20Revision.doc

Kunoto Chishi
08d4407

Ekta said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ekta said...

EKTA D.KATARIA
1 FEP
08D4452

Q:WHO WROTE THE FIRST NOVEL?
"THE TALE OF GENJI" IS CONSIDERED TO BE THE WORLDS FIRST FULL-LENGTH NOVEL.
IT WAS WRITTEN BY A NOBELWOMAN NAMED MURASAKI SHIKIBU IN THE EARLY ELEVENTH CENTURY.

Vani Subramaniam said...

Q: Types of novels
A: 1. Realistic Novel
This sort of novel is sometimes called a novel of manners. A realistic novel can be characterized by its complex characters with mixed motives that are rooted in social class and operate according to a highly developed social structure. The characters in a realistic novel interact with other characters and undergo plausible and everyday experiences.

2. Prose Romance
This is a novel that is often set in the historical past with a plot that emphasizes adventure and an atmosphere that is removed from reality. The characters in a prose romance are either sharply drawn as villains or heroes, masters or victims; while the protagonist is solitary and isolated from society.
(for my refrerance)- protagonist- a leading character or a pricipal figure in a literary work

3. Novel of Incident
In a novel of incident the narrative focuses on what the protagonist will do next and how the story will turn out.



4. Novel of Character
A novel of character focuses on the protagonist's motives for what he/she does and how he/she will turn out.

5. Epistolary Novel
This first person narrative progresses in the form of letters, journals, or diaries.



6. Picaresque Novel
A picaresque novel relates the adventures of an eccentric or disreputable hero in episodic form.



7. Historical Novel
A historical novel is a novel set in a period earlier than that of the writing.



8. Regional Novel
A regional novel is a novel that is set against the background of a particular area.



9. Non-fictional Novel
This type of novel depicts living people and recent events fictionalized in the form of a story.



10. Bildungsroman
German term that indicates a novel of growth. This fictional autobiography is concerned with the development of the protagonist's mind, spirit, and character from childhood to adulthood.



11. Roman à thèse
French term that refers to a social novel that has an argument, social, or political message.



12. Roman à clef
French term for a novel with a key; imaginary events with real people disguised as fictional characters.



13. Roman-fleuve
French term for a narrative that has a common theme or range of characters that stretch across a number of novels.

Source- Google-The Literary Explorer- Author-Renee Goodvin- some parts adapted form The OXford Companion of English Language by Tom McArthur and A Glossary of Literary Terms, 6th edition by M.H.Abrams

Vani
08D4439

Manisha Kumar said...

How does one interpret the depth of a novel?

This depends chiefly on the reader.It is the novelist's task to bring forth an idea through his words and the reader's task to interpret it. An idea can have several interpretations. The depth of a novel can be determined by the reader's understanding. We, as readers and critiques of a novel, must have the ability to "read between the lines", and understand the significance of some words, without just taking into consideration the literal meaning.

But, a novelist should make sure that he utilizes the right tools to convey his message/idea. He can use symbolism, figures of speech, and other literary devices to bring out the depth in his piece. But in order to do this he does NOT have to use large, sophisticated words. A simple line can carry a great deal of significance.

Manisha Kumar
08D4424

Anonymous said...

EVITA
08D4422
1 FEP

Q:WHAT ARE THE COMMON TOPICS OF NOVELS?
A:1)mystry
2)romance
3)comedy
4)educational

Anonymous said...

Arundathi Ramanan
1st FEP
08D4451
Who was the youngest person to write a novel?
Christopher Beale completed his 1,500-word, five-chapter novel This and Last Season's Excursions when he was six years and 118 days old, beating the previous Guinness World Record by 42 days.
source-yahoo answers.

Anonymous said...

Namratha Raman
1st FEP
08D4430
Which was the worst rated novel?
Robert Burrows' "Great American Parade", was crowned the worst ever novel by the Washington Post.

anjali john said...

Anjali John
1st FEP
08d4416

Why do we study novel?


A novel is today a long prose narrative set out in writing. The seventeenth century genre conflict between long romances and short novels, novellas ,has brought definition of both traditions into modern usage of the term.

Today novel has become a medium of national awareness on a global scale. Well written novels examine the general questions that humans ponder. Through reading novels we can answer questions about ourselves and humanity. Many historical aspects are able to reach the readers hand easily rather than referring to some text concern. The characters referred in the novel are able to taken into heart by reading them.

They have served not merely as diversions but as companions for so much of our lives, offering hours of pleasure and,at their best, insights few of us can ever quantify. The simple joy of reading novels sometimes obscures our awareness of the deeper roles they play in our lives honing our intellect, quenching our thirsts, and shaping our sense of ourselves and of the world we live in.

Reference:

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/novels

alika said...

How do novels become bestsellers?

A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. Some lists are broken down into classifications and specialties (number one best selling new cookbook, novel, nonfiction, etc.). The New York Times Best Seller list is one of the best-known bestseller lists for the US.

In everyday use, the term bestseller is not usually associated with a specified level of sales, and may be used very loosely indeed in publisher's publicity. Bestsellers tend not to be books considered of superior academic value or literary quality, though there are exceptions. Lists simply give the highest-selling titles in the category over the stated period. Some books have sold many more copies than contemporary "bestsellers", but over a long period of time.

Blockbusters for films and chart-toppers in recorded music are similar terms, although, in film and music, these measures generally are related to industry sales figures for attendance, requests, broadcast plays, or units sold.

Particularly in the case of novels, a large budget, and a chain of literary agents, editors, publishers, reviewers, retailers, and marketing efforts are involved in "making" bestsellers.


Early bestsellers
The term bestseller, has a relatively modern etymological origin since it was first used in 1889[citation needed], but the phenomenon of immediate popularity goes back to the early days of mass production of printed books. For earlier books, when the maximum number of copies that would be printed was relatively small, a count of editions is the best way to assess sales. Since effective copyright was slow to take hold, many editions were pirated well into the period of the Enlightenment, and without effective royalty systems in place, authors often saw little, if any, of the revenues for their popular works.

The earliest highly popular books were nearly all religious, but the Bible, as a large book, remained expensive until the nineteenth century. This tended to keep the numbers printed and sold low. Unlike today, it was important for a book to be short to be a bestseller, or it would be too expensive to reach a large audience. Very short works such as Ars moriendi, the Biblia pauperum, and versions of the Apocalypse were published as cheap block-books in large numbers of different editions in several languages in the fifteenth century. These were probably affordable items for most of the minority of literate members of the population. In 16th and 17th century England Pilgrim's Progress (1678) and abridged versions of Foxe's Book of Martyrs were the most broadly read books. Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Roderick Random (1748) were early eighteenth century short novels with very large publication numbers, as well as gaining international success.[1]

Tristram Shandy, a rather long novel by Laurence Sterne, became a "cult" object in England and throughout Europe, with important cultural consequences among those who could afford to purchase books during the era of its publication. The same could be said of the works of Rousseau, especially Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse (1761), and of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's novel, Die Leiden des jungen Werther (The Sorrows of Young Werther) (1774). As with some modern bestsellers, Werther spawned what today, would be called a spin-off industry, with items such as Werther eau de cologne and porcelain puppets depicting the main characters, being sold in large numbers.[2]

By the time of Byron and Sir Walter Scott, effective copyright laws existed, at least in England, and many authors depended heavily on their income from their large royalties. America remained a zone of piracy until the mid-nineteenth century, a fact of which Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain, bitterly complained. By the middle of the 19th century, a situation akin to modern publication had emerged, where most bestsellers were written for a popular taste and are now almost entirely forgotten, with odd exceptions such as East Lynne (remembered only for the line "Gone, gone, and never called me mother!"), the wildly popular Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Sherlock Holmes.

anu philip said...

anu philip
1st fep
08d4444

Q. Does print culture help in the development of novel.
i think that print culture has truly helped in the development of novel and other writings . intially when the printing had started the writtings/books were circulated only among the high class people but later it started reaching to the commomnpeople also.

the invention of printing subjected both novel andromances to a first wave of trivialization and commercialization. printed books were expencive, yet something people would buy, just as people still buy expensive things they can barely afford

alika said...

How do novels become bestsellers?

A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. Some lists are broken down into classifications and specialties (number one best selling new cookbook, novel, nonfiction, etc.). The New York Times Best Seller list is one of the best-known bestseller lists for the US.

In everyday use, the term bestseller is not usually associated with a specified level of sales, and may be used very loosely indeed in publisher's publicity. Bestsellers tend not to be books considered of superior academic value or literary quality, though there are exceptions. Lists simply give the highest-selling titles in the category over the stated period. Some books have sold many more copies than contemporary "bestsellers", but over a long period of time.

Blockbusters for films and chart-toppers in recorded music are similar terms, although, in film and music, these measures generally are related to industry sales figures for attendance, requests, broadcast plays, or units sold.

Particularly in the case of novels, a large budget, and a chain of literary agents, editors, publishers, reviewers, retailers, and marketing efforts are involved in "making" bestsellers.


Early bestsellers
The term bestseller, has a relatively modern etymological origin since it was first used in 1889[citation needed], but the phenomenon of immediate popularity goes back to the early days of mass production of printed books. For earlier books, when the maximum number of copies that would be printed was relatively small, a count of editions is the best way to assess sales. Since effective copyright was slow to take hold, many editions were pirated well into the period of the Enlightenment, and without effective royalty systems in place, authors often saw little, if any, of the revenues for their popular works.

The earliest highly popular books were nearly all religious, but the Bible, as a large book, remained expensive until the nineteenth century. This tended to keep the numbers printed and sold low. Unlike today, it was important for a book to be short to be a bestseller, or it would be too expensive to reach a large audience. Very short works such as Ars moriendi, the Biblia pauperum, and versions of the Apocalypse were published as cheap block-books in large numbers of different editions in several languages in the fifteenth century. These were probably affordable items for most of the minority of literate members of the population. In 16th and 17th century England Pilgrim's Progress (1678) and abridged versions of Foxe's Book of Martyrs were the most broadly read books. Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Roderick Random (1748) were early eighteenth century short novels with very large publication numbers, as well as gaining international success.[1]

Tristram Shandy, a rather long novel by Laurence Sterne, became a "cult" object in England and throughout Europe, with important cultural consequences among those who could afford to purchase books during the era of its publication. The same could be said of the works of Rousseau, especially Julie, ou la nouvelle Héloïse (1761), and of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's novel, Die Leiden des jungen Werther (The Sorrows of Young Werther) (1774). As with some modern bestsellers, Werther spawned what today, would be called a spin-off industry, with items such as Werther eau de cologne and porcelain puppets depicting the main characters, being sold in large numbers.[2]

By the time of Byron and Sir Walter Scott, effective copyright laws existed, at least in England, and many authors depended heavily on their income from their large royalties. America remained a zone of piracy until the mid-nineteenth century, a fact of which Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain, bitterly complained. By the middle of the 19th century, a situation akin to modern publication had emerged, where most bestsellers were written for a popular taste and are now almost entirely forgotten, with odd exceptions such as East Lynne (remembered only for the line "Gone, gone, and never called me mother!"), the wildly popular Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Sherlock Holmes.

Reference

http://www.answers.com/topic/bestseller

joseph said...

JOSEPH.M.HARRIS
1ST F.E.P
08D4442

Q:Which is the worlds first novel?
A)In the year 1007 a Japanese noble woman, Murasaki Shikibu, wrote the world's first full novel
Called "The tale of Genji," it tells the story of a prince looking for love and wisdom..In its English translation it covers 54 chapters over 1,000 pages of text.

Q:Which is the first english novel?
A)Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, written circa 1470, published 1485.

Syeda Sumaiya said...

Q:- Define "Novel".
A:- "NOVEL" is an extended fictional work in prose, usually in a form of a story.Long prose fiction text involving character and action and telling a story; the author's purpose is often to convey a particular idea or message about a culture or society.

Q:-Derivation of the word "NOVEL".
A:A novel (from, Italian novella, Spanish novela, French nouvelle for "new", "news", or "short story of something new") is today a long written, fictional, prose narrative.

Syeda Sumaiya Kouser
1st FEP
08d4463

Mystique said...

Shaliny Chandy
08D4476
1st FEP

Q. How relevant are novels in helping us to understand a particular age and culture?

Novels can go a long way in helping us understand a particular age and culture. For this, we need to interpret the novel historically.This involves interpreting the novel keeping in mind the social, cultural, economic and political aspects. Throughout the novel there are hints that help us in interpreting the novel in such a way. Through the events and attitudes that a novel conveys, it provides the reader with the experience of going back in time to a different way of life, in a setting that is entirely different from the one in which he/she lives. The descriptions used, the settings, the characters, their conversations, the events and all the details including the most minute ones help us in understanding the social, economic , cultural and political aspects of life in that particular time period.They give the reader a sense of living in the settings described in the novel. This is important in understanding a particular age from a broader perspective.

While analyzing reliable sources of information regarding various social and cultural aspects, we tend to focus on information rather than the broader aspects of knowing. This broader knowing component of historical understanding cannot come through direct participation. Vicarious experience enhances this kind of historical understanding and novels can provide such experience in a condensed manner which far outstrips the scope of direct participation or observation.

Authentic historic novels are those in which the author's version of the novel's setting involves a serious attempt to understand the historical period in which the novel is set.However, while a serious historic novelist is interested in knowing various aspects of the human condition, choosing a historic setting means that the novelist's main concern is in knowing the historic setting. The richer in authentic details the novel is, the greater is the potential.

Also, through comparing known facts about the historical period and through references in the novel,the reader is able to construct a historically accurate picture of life in that particular period and in that particular community. Thus, the novel comes across as a very useful source of knowledge in understanding a particular age and culture.

Anonymous said...

Siddharth Venkat
1st FEP
08d412

What are the different genres of novels?

* Campus
* Crime fiction
* Fantasy
* Gothic
* Horror
* Romance
* Spy
* Thriller
* Science fiction
* Speculative
* Westerns

NIMESHIKA said...

How to Analyze a Novel?
When you set out to critically analyze a novel, you have a mighty task ahead of you. This is not a short story, poem, or essay. Rather, it is a lengthy work of fiction, designed to create any number of emotions in you. While most of them are inspiring, the thought of having to analyze a novel is possibly terrifying because of the size of most novels. However, the beauty behind novel analysis is that there are so many things you can do. Most novels have numerous serious themes spread throughout, and many more sub-plots (sub-themes). The most important thing to remember in analyzing a novel is that — like other analyses — there is not usually a right or wrong answer. There is only an analysis that is supported with factual details and evidence from the text. Everything you will need to analyze the novel will come from the novel itself. You can always research farther; however, you can analyze a novel without going outside the ends of the book.

Follow these simple guidelines to aid in your novel analysis.
1.Read the novel closely. A close reading of a novel is different than a quick skim. If you have time, it would behoove you to read the novel at least twice. However, as a student, you probably do not have sufficient time. So, pick up the novel, a pen, and read it while making marks in the margins. Underline lines that stand out at you. These will be your best friends while analyzing it in the future. Nothing is worse than having to look back at a novel of hundreds of pages without having a clue as to where to find that specific line you remember. If you marked it during your first read through, you will be able to find specific lines much easier later on.
2.Make an appointment to speak with your teacher/professor.
While analyzing a poem or story, you have people to discuss ideas with, as they will be dealing with many of the same issues. It is helpful to share thoughts. However, when analyzing a novel, you will probably not be writing or analyzing the same thing as the rest of your peers. Your teachers will be great sources of inspiration and help. You may get stuck on a certain idea, theme, or problem; they are trained to help teach you analytical skills. After reading the novel and thinking about ideas for analysis, discuss them with a teacher. Your teacher will then sway you in a specific direction and help you organize your thoughts.
3.Select a specific topic.
Once you have read the novel, discussed it in class or in private with a tutor, you are ready to begin the analysis. You have already begun unofficially by thinking about it. Now, with the numerous issues addressed in the novel, you have your easy pick, and can focus on one specific theme to analyze in the book. A problem many students encounter in this portion is that they try to analyze too many parts of the book or too many themes. You must pick one theme (and show it in several characters) or select one character and analyze him or her. It is imperative to stay on target and not veer from you thesis (your central topic).
4.Find evidence.
Once you have decided upon a topic to analyze in the novel, you must now go through the book and find examples of how to prove your thesis (argument). If you had not previously taken notes or wrote in the book, then you will have to go page by page to find specific examples to use in your analysis. This step can be fairly time-consuming. However, without this step, you have absolutely no analysis. You must have evidence in order to analyze a novel. 5.Write an outline Like any analysis, essay, or research paper, an outline is vital. It is the skeleton of your analysis, the scaffolding that holds your ideas together. It is your organizational crutch. Your outline for the novel analysis should begin with an introduction (including a thesis statement), followed by three examples of the theme in your novel, and a conclusion bringing all the examples of the themes together. This conclusion will be significant in an analysis, for you will be putting together what you have just explained into a greater context. The conclusion is the ultimate analysis of the novel and should leave the audience/readership understanding the novel in a new light.
(bookrags.com,bookrags articles)


What is the structure of a novel?

”Dramas should be complete and whole in themselves, with a beginning, middle and an end...with all the organic unity of a living creature.” Aristotle. The key to creating a novel is to build it one scene at a time. If each scene is well crafted, it will draw the reader to the next. If scenes are unified, each leading logically to the next, and each revealing a little more about the focus characters, and each progressing toward a satisfactory answer to the story question, the novel will take shape naturally. The beginning:
1. Introduces the characters
2. Establishes the situation
3. States the conflict
4. Poses the story question (which should lead to the premise)
The middle: A progression of consequential events, involving the characters who change as a result of those events.
1. Each event must lead toward resolution of the conflict.
2. Each event must reveal more about the characters.
3. Each event must relate A novel is an extended fictional narrative, usually written in prose. Fiction, regardless of its attempt at verisimilitude, is a created world apart, a world of the possible or probable or even the fantastic rather than the actual. Fiction is governed by its own rules and internal completeness. The only obligation of the writer is to make the story interesting. The measure of success of a work of fiction is how well or poorly the author has unified the story and controlled its impact. In The Art of Fiction John Gardner says: A novel is like a symphony in that its closing movement echoes and resounds with all that has gone before. . . . Toward the close of a novel. . . . unexpected connections begin to surface; hidden causes become plain; life becomes, however briefly and unstably, organized; the universe reveals itself, if only for the moment, as inexorably moral; the outcome of the various characters' actions is at last manifest; and we see the responsibility of free will. (184) A novel aims for a comprehensive unified effect in which all of the elements of fiction intertwine to make a comment on the human condition.
The elements of fiction are :
Plot: what happens in the story
Character: who is involved in what happens in the story
Point of View: how the story is told
Setting: where and when the story takes place
Theme: what the point of the story is An ability to identify these elements in a novel and then understand how all of these elements work together to provide the effect of the novel on the reading leads to a critical understanding of a novel. Novels © 2005 Dr. Agatha Taormina Last Revised:April 24, 2006-->--> to the premise. (SOURCE)
The end:
1. The climax, which is the pivotal event which resolves the conflict and proves the premise.
2. The resolution, which answers the story question, if the answer is not obvious as a result of the climax.
3. Each event must relate to the premise.

Nimeshika Venkatesan
I FEP 08D4427

Mammen said...

Hima Mammen
Roll No: 08D4423
Ist FEP

Question:

Reasons for the Novel's Popularity?

Answer:
Since the eighteenth century, and particularly since the Victorian period, the novel, replacing poetry and drama, has become the most popular of literary forms--perhaps because it most closely represents the lives of the majority of people. The novel became increasingly popular as its social scope expanded to include characters and stories about the middle and working classes. Because of its readership, which included a large percentage of women and servants, the novel became the form which most addressed the domestic and social concerns of these groups.

Source: http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/novel.html

Shreya said...

Q:Which are the top 30 bestselling novels?
Ans:The top 30 bestsellers are:
Rank | Title | Author Results: 1-30 | 31-60 | 61-90 | 91-120 | 121-150
1. Twilight
Stephenie Meyer, Little, Brown
Young adult: First in vampire love saga: Isabella falls for a vampire (F) (P) $8.99

Weeks in Top 150: 88 Last week: 1 Entered Top 150: 8/31/2006 Peak: 1
2. New Moon
Stephenie Meyer, Little, Brown Young Readers
Young adult: Second in the vampire love saga (F) (P) $10.99

Weeks in Top 150: 98 Last week: 3 Entered Top 150: 8/24/2006 Peak: 2
3. The Shack
William P. Young, Windblown Media
Man reconnects with God after death of child (F) (P) $14.99

Weeks in Top 150: 26 Last week: 2 Entered Top 150: 1/24/2008 Peak: 2
4. Eclipse
Stephenie Meyer, Little, Brown
Young adult: Third in vampire love saga (F) (H) $18.99

Weeks in Top 150: 51 Last week: 5 Entered Top 150: 8/16/2007 Peak: 1
5. The Last Lecture
Randy Pausch, Jeffrey Zaslow, Hyperion
Professor Randy Pausch's "last lecture" on what matters most -- living (NF) (H) $21.95

Weeks in Top 150: 16 Last week: 8 Entered Top 150: 4/17/2008 Peak: 1
6. Playing For Pizza
John Grisham, Dell
American's fortunes change when he plays football for the Panthers of Parma, Italy (F) (P) $7.99

Weeks in Top 150: 19 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 10/4/2007 Peak: 2
7. The Dangerous Days Of Daniel X
James Patterson, Michael Ledwidge, Little, Brown
An earthbound alien teen with superpowers seeks revenge against his parents' killer (F) (H) $20.00

Weeks in Top 150: 1 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 7/31/2008 Peak: 7
8. Artemis Fowl: The Time Paradox
Eoin Colfer, Disney-Hyperion
Artemis must time travel and find extinct lemurs to save his ill mother (F) (H) $17.99

Weeks in Top 150: 2 Last week: 4 Entered Top 150: 7/24/2008 Peak: 4
9. Play Dirty: A Novel
Sandra Brown, Pocket
Fallen football star tries to find redemption after he is released from prison (F) (P) $9.99

Weeks in Top 150: 1 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 7/31/2008 Peak: 9
10. Moscow Rules
Daniel Silva, Putnam
A journalist's death leads a Mossad agent to Moscow to stop a terrorist plot (F) (H) $26.95

Weeks in Top 150: 1 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 7/31/2008 Peak: 10
11. Tribute
Nora Roberts, Putnam
Romance: Former child actress finds romance while restoring her late grandmother's Virginia estate (F) (H) $26.95

Weeks in Top 150: 3 Last week: 6 Entered Top 150: 7/17/2008 Peak: 1
12. Someday Soon
Debbie Macomber, Avon
Romance: Young widow meets professional soldier on San Francisco pier (F) (P) $7.99

Weeks in Top 150: 9 Last week: 7 Entered Top 150: 5/18/1995 Peak: 3
13. Three Cups of Tea
Greg Mortenson, David Oliver Relin, Penguin
Subtitle: "One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time" (NF) (P) $15.00

Weeks in Top 150: 73 Last week: 10 Entered Top 150: 3/15/2007 Peak: 4
14. When You Are Engulfed in Flames
David Sedaris, Little, Brown
Sedaris' sixth collection of essays focuses on the bizarre moments in his life (NF) (H) $25.99

Weeks in Top 150: 8 Last week: 11 Entered Top 150: 6/12/2008 Peak: 1
15. The Host
Stephenie Meyer, Little, Brown
Love triangle involving a man, a woman and the alien that possesses her (F) (H) $25.99

Weeks in Top 150: 12 Last week: 14 Entered Top 150: 5/15/2008 Peak: 3
16. Eat, Pray, Love
Elizabeth Gilbert, Penguin
Memoir; Subtitle: "One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia" (NF) (P) $15.00

Weeks in Top 150: 80 Last week: 24 Entered Top 150: 3/30/2006 Peak: 1
17. A New Earth
Eckhart Tolle, Plume
Subtitle: "Awakening to Your Life's Purpose"; Oprah's Book Club, Jan. 2008 (NF) (P) $14.00

Weeks in Top 150: 28 Last week: 16 Entered Top 150: 10/20/2005 Peak: 1
18. The Secret
Rhonda Byrne, Atria/Beyond Words
Promises to be "life-transforming for all who experience it" (NF) (H) $23.95

Weeks in Top 150: 87 Last week: 21 Entered Top 150: 12/7/2006 Peak: 1
19. Into The Fire
Suzanne Brockmann, Ballantine
Ex-marine resurfaces to clear his name after he is accused of an assassination (F) (H) $25.00

Weeks in Top 150: 1 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 7/31/2008 Peak: 19
20. Fast Track
Fern Michaels, Zebra
After an enforced exile, the seven vigilantes that form the "Sisterhood" set out on a new assignment (F) (P) $6.99

Weeks in Top 150: 5 Last week: 9 Entered Top 150: 7/3/2008 Peak: 5
21. Double Take: An FBI Thriller
Catherine Coulter, Jove
FBI agents Dillon Savich and Lacey Sherlock investigate a murder with a psychic twist (F) (P) $7.99

Weeks in Top 150: 5 Last week: 15 Entered Top 150: 7/3/2008 Peak: 9
22. You: Staying Young
Michael F. Roizen, Mehmet C. Oz, Free Press
Subtitle: "The Owner's Manual for Extending Your Warranty" (NF) (H) $26.00

Weeks in Top 150: 22 Last week: -- Entered Top 150: 11/8/2007 Peak: 1
23. Fearless Fourteen
Janet Evanovich, St. Martin's Press
Bounty hunter Stephanie Plum protects an out-of-control celebrity (F) (H) $27.95

Weeks in Top 150: 6 Last week: 12 Entered Top 150: 6/26/2008 Peak: 1
24. Sail
James Patterson, Howard Roughan, Little, Brown
A widow plans an elaborate sailing vacation to reunite her family (F) (H) $27.99

Weeks in Top 150: 7 Last week: 19 Entered Top 150: 6/19/2008 Peak: 1
25. The Story of Edgar Sawtelle: A Novel
David Wroblewski, Ecco
A mute boy whose family trains dogs must deal with a tragic loss (F) (H) $25.95

Weeks in Top 150: 7 Last week: 26 Entered Top 150: 6/19/2008 Peak: 25
26. The MacGregor Grooms
Nora Roberts, Silhouette
Romance: Daniel MacGregor wants his three grandsons married (F) (P) $7.99

Weeks in Top 150: 18 Last week: 13 Entered Top 150: 10/15/1998 Peak: 2
27. Water for Elephants
Sara Gruen, Algonquin
Love, drama in a circus in the 1930s (F) (P) $13.95

Weeks in Top 150: 75 Last week: 37 Entered Top 150: 6/29/2006 Peak: 4
28. Dear John
Nicholas Sparks, Grand Central Publishing
A volunteer worker and a soldier on leave find love in the aftermath of Sept. 11 (F) (P) $7.99

Weeks in Top 150: 42 Last week: 23 Entered Top 150: 11/2/2006 Peak: 3
29. Watchmen
Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons, DC Comics
Rorschach reunites with his former teammates in an attempt to save the world (F) (P) $19.99

Weeks in Top 150: 2 Last week: 83 Entered Top 150: 7/24/2008 Peak: 29
30. Six Disciplines Execution Revolution
Gary Harpst, Six Disciplines Publishing
Business problem-solving solutions (NF) (H) $12.95

Weeks in Top 150: 2 Last week: 99 Entered Top 150: 7/24/2008 Peak: 30

Oviya Sekar said...

Oviya Sekar
08D4429
I FEP

Question:
What is the ideal length of a novel?

Answer:
“It sort of depends on the publisher. Here's how it works:
500-1,000 words - Flash story
1,000-10,000 words - Short story
10,000-40,000 - Novella
Now, TECHNICALLY, over 40,000 constitutes a "novel." However,
40,000-60,000 - Novelette or "Novel Lite"
60,000 and up – Novel”
-www.absolutewrite.com

“Well, officially, there are length requirements, and they're actually based on what magazines can, or used to, be able to serialize. The SF and fantasy magazines, who still buy short stories, novelettes, and novellas still post the length guidelines on their websites.

Even many adult novels, bestsellers, have been shorter than 50,000 words, and for YA, novel length is often 30,000, or even less. But even for adults, the lengths are:

Short short--1,000-2,000 words.
Short Story--2,000-7,500 words.
Novelette--7,500-17,500 words.
Novella--17,500-40,000 words.
Novel--anything over 40,000 words.

Outside of SF and Fantasy, a novella is 15,000-30,000 words.

A fair number of published, and highly successful, top of the bestseller list novels have been under 50,000 words. The shortest I can think of off the top of my head may have been The Bridges of Madison County, which came in at just about exactly 35,000 words, and it was at the top of the bestseller list three times, and set an all time sales record for adult hardcover.

The Notebook was also a massive bestseller, and it, too, came in under the 50,000 word mark.

I've seen that 50,000 word thing around the internet, too, but someone just made it up at some point. Average adult novel length is 100,000 words, but there have been thousands of adult novels that came in at 50,000 or under, though many of them, probably most, have been paperback originals.

In the end, of course, the novel length you actually have to write is whatever a given publisher says it is for a given line of books. Some lines love short novels, and some won't even look at a novel that's under 80,000 words.”
-www.writersdigest.com

Anagha said...

Anagha
08D4413
I FEP

QUESTION:Why is the detective novel so popular?


ANSWER:“The Detective novel has always been related to public interest in the problems of modern, urban life, particularly in crime. But crime as a feature of Western social life was not generally recognized until the rise of large cities in the early 1800s, a period that corresponds to the creation of a mass reading public. Fascinated by and afraid of crime, new city-dwellers vilified and romanticized criminals, as well as those who fought them.

The first writing on urban crime pretended to be documentary, but it was filled with archetypes and plots from preceding fiction, particularly the gothic novel. The idea of detection and the figure of the detective that would eventually stand at the center of the genre were introduced in the early nineteenth century by a Frenchman, Francois-Eugene Vidocq in his Memoirs of Vidocq.”
-www.detnovel.com

arpitha said...

Arpitha Francis
08D4418
1 fep

How many pages does the longest novel contain?
The longest novel is said to be "the story of the vivian girls"written by Henry Darger.
Illustrated fantasy novel manuscript typed single-spaced with 15,145 pages in 10 volumes. Discovered after Darger's death, the manuscript has never been published. The total number of words has been estimated; some believe this might be the longest novel ever written.[1] 15,145 pages at 600 words per page (typical for old typewriters set to single spaced lines) would result in over 9 million words.
REF:wikipedia.

rakshitha.s said...

Rakshitha
1st fep
08D4456

Why do we have many editions of a book?
-> an edition is a number of prints struck from one plate, usually at the same point in time. This may be a limited edition, with a fixed number of impressions produced on the understanding that no further impressions (copies) will be produced later, or an open edition limited only by the number that can be sold or produced before the plate wears.
editions are usually when there are any updates or when the previous edition is improvised, even when its translated into other languages to make it easy for the readers.
A "first edition" per se is not a valuable collectible book. A popular work may be published and reprinted over time by many publishers, and in a variety of formats. There will be a first edition of each, which the publisher may cite on the copyright page, such as: "First mass market paperback edition". The first edition of a facsimile reprint is the reprint publisher's first edition, but not the first edition of the work itself.
From time to time, readers may observe an error in the text (or, in the days of metal type, a piece of broken type), and report these to the publisher. The publisher typically keeps these reprint corrections in a file pending demand for a new print run of the edition, and before the new run is printed, they will be entered.
This is mostly why we have many editions of a book or novel.

Komal Sabharwal said...

Komal Sabharwal
Ist FEP
08D4453

Ques:What points should a writer take care while placing a character?

1. Concreteness:Characters have specific homes, possessions, medical histories, tastes in furniture, political opinions. Apart from creating verisimilitude, these concrete aspects of the characters should convey information about the story.

2. Symbolic association: You can express a character's nature metaphorically through objects or settings (a rusty sword, an apple orchard in bloom, a violent thunderstorm). These may not be perfectly understandable to the reader at first but they seem subconsciously right. Symbolic associations can be consciously ``archetypal''linking the character to similar characters in literature. Or you may use symbols in some private system which the reader may or may not consciously grasp. Characters' names can form symbolic associations, though this practice has become less popular in modern fiction except in comic or ironic writing.

3.Speech: The character's speech (both content and manner) helps to evoke personality: shy and reticent, aggressive and frank, coy, humorous. Both content and manner of speech should accurately reflect the character's social and ethnic background without stereotyping. If a character ``speaks prose,'' his or her background should justify that rather artificial manner. If a character is inarticulate, that in itself should convey something.

4.Behavior: From table manners to performance in hand-to-hand combat, each new example of behavior should be consistent with what we already know of the character, yet it should reveal some new aspect of personality. Behavior under different forms of stress should be especially revealing.

5. Motivation. The characters should have good and sufficient reasons for their actions, and should carry those actions out with plausible skills. If we don't believe characters would do what the author tells us they do, the story fails.

6.Change: Characters should respond to their experiences by changing--or by working hard to avoid changing. As they seek to carry out their agendas, run into conflicts, fail or succeed, and confront new problems, they will not stay the same people. If a character seems the same at the end of a story as at the beginning, the reader at least should be changed and be aware of whatever factors kept the character from growing and developing.

Trissa Mathew said...

Yes, novels are interesting. Novels cover each and every aspect of human life. Most novels provide a source of inspiration, enjoyment, information etc. Novels are written in lucid manner. The language used is common mans language, that makes it easy for people to read it. Most novels keep the suspense to the end. The curiosity to know the suspense keeps the reader immersed in reading.

Trissa Mathew
08D4438
I FEP

est said...

POLITICS IN RATING
Politics and rating they are always in a constant interplay with each other, literature is many a times subjective to political and commercial interpretation. The meaning of liberation maybe the denial in another.

· Why do we rate a novel? Uses of rating a novel?
We rate a novel to promote a novel; it also provides the readers a platform to voice their opinions. Rating is an indirect feedback to the author. Rating helps the reader to identify the quality and standard of the book.

esther jc
08d4421

ABHISHEK CHAUDHARY said...

THE INTERDISCIPLINARY NOVEL HAS, critically, no such "birth" period. all novels have directly or indirectly traversed over various disciplines and hence my question about interdisciplinary novel and its birth isnt invalid but ambiguous.

Susanne Rai said...

for a novel, it is not always possible to deliver each and every message or intention clearly only through words.

author may fall down somewhere and he/she might feel a need for a picture or a further extention of writing. but if this happens, what will happen to basic novel genre?

these are the limitations of the genre

Abey Jose said...

Abey Jose
1st FEP
08D4475

DO WE APPROVE OF MOVIES BEING MADE OUT OF NOVELS ?

A movie cannot capture all the details mentioned in the novel and present them .But most of the movies which have come out of novels have been very popular for the fact that they are the product of bestselling novels .

joshy mathew said...

Joshy Mathew
08d4406
1FEP

QUE. WHICH IS THE BEST SELLING NOVEL AMONG INDIAN NOVELS?
ANS. Chetan Bhagat's "Five Point Someone" & "One Night @ Call Centre" sold a combined 1million copies;(only the autobiography of Mahathma Gandhi sold more). Currently chetan Bhagat's "Three Mistakes of My Life" is the best seller among Indian novels.
(Ref. google.com)

Eben said...

eben johnson
08d4405
1 fep (aha aha aha )(egostic noises )

q)why do we have novels in our course
a)ummm welll i think its cause christ university thinks it might help us in our future in the media industry but yeah i dunt agree ......

Eben said...

.....

Shreya said...

i agree with you we should have more practical on feild training....